How to Ask for a Raise

Asking for a raise can be an intimidating task. Having that chat with your boss or manager can feel daunting if your company doesn’t have an annual pay increase. However, even though it may seem uncomfortable, there are ways to prepare for this conversation and lead yourself in confidently. 

While you read through our tips and reminders, don’t forget that it is well within your right to ask for a raise if you know you deserve one. Opening this opportunity for yourself may result in a positive outcome. 

Build your case 

Take a look back at recent projects where you put in extra work than was expected. If there were times your participation was a reason for success, take this into consideration. You want to reiterate your value to the team and company. Using any type of performance data will help build your case. It can be helpful, throughout the year, to collect any praise or recognition you receive. This will be helpful to refer to when asking for a raise. 

Determine how much you should ask for 

This is a big step that you should always consider before talking to your boss. Forbes advises going in with a specific number in mind. They say, “Without a specific number, it’s hard for managers or human resources professionals to know how you’re valuing yourself or what will close the deal.” Do some research beforehand to determine the competitive salary in your industry or role. This will help you determine where you should go from there based on your work performance. 

Ask at the right time 

It’s important to know the right time to ask for a raise. For instance, don’t ask during sensitive times such as layoffs or recessions. If your company has annual pay increases, you can approach your boss a couple months prior. However, if they don’t, Business News Daily suggests “try to make your request during a “good” time, such as when you know your boss is pleased with your work, during a successful quarter, or a time of year when everyone isn’t stressed out.” 

Be respectful 

While you should enter the conversation confidently, you should also maintain respect. If it doesn’t go the way you’d hope, try asking what you can do to improve or change, rather than getting frustrated. Alternately, respect yourself as well. Don’t let anyone string you along if you’re putting in the work. And if you do get that raise, be sure to express your appreciation and excitement, while also setting new goals for yourself professionally.  

If you’re looking to switch careers or want to work with a talented, supportive recruiter, contact Green Key today or browse our open jobs!

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