06Jun

Did you miss the newest release of the annual list of “Best Healthcare Jobs” by U.S. News & World Report?

Coming out just after the start of the new year when so much other news made the headlines, the list of all the “Best Jobs,” which includes healthcare, didn’t make its usual splash. Too bad, because the U.S. News methodology makes it more than a popularity contest, taking into account hiring demand, projected growth, occupational unemployment, pay, and measures like stress levels and work-life balance.

We singled out healthcare jobs, even though the list covers all sorts of industries and occupations because of its dominance. Of the top 10 jobs on the list of 100, 7 are in healthcare. Software developer, as is so frequently the case, ranks first, but right behind are dentist, physician assistant, orthodontist and nurse practitioner.

Registered nurse, often among the top 10 on previous lists, came in 13th. That’s only because the demand for several specialties with higher pay and fewer qualified professionals has grown even larger. Far more nurses are needed by 2028 (371,500) than speech-language pathologists (41,900).

As in-demand as these jobs are, Green Key Resources can help you fill vacancies fast. We know where the best people are and how to reach them. So if you are looking to fill a nursing job or have an opening for a physical therapist or other professional, one call to 212.683.1988 will put you in touch with a recruiting specialist who knows the industry and will work with you to get just the talent you want.

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Jun 6, 2023

Statins Show Promise in Reducing Death from Ovarian Cancer

Women with ovarian cancer who take statins to lower their cholesterol have a 40% lower death rate.

“These drugs are appealing as they are widely used, inexpensive, and well tolerated in most patients. The associated reduction in ovarian cancer mortality is promising,” said Dr. Kala Visvanathan, lead researcher of a new study presented last week during the American Association for Cancer Research Virtual Annual Meeting II.

Dr. Visvanathan, professor of epidemiology and oncology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center in Baltimore, said all statins reduced the risk of dying, with lipophilic statins such as simvastatin and lovastatin, decreasing the likelihood by an average 43%. The most significant reductions occurred in those with high-grade serous carcinoma (40% reduction in mortality) and endometrioid ovarian cancer (50% reduction.)

The findings are the most comprehensive to date and add support to other, smaller studies showing similar improvements in ovarian cancer mortality from statins.

Most recently, a team of researchers at Australia’s QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, analyzed 36 studies of several common medications taken by ovarian cancer patient. They concluded statin use showed the most promise. “Statin use is associated with better ovarian cancer survival,” they wrote in an article this month in Gynecologic Oncology, cautioning that, “Further study, preferably a clinical trial, is required.”

At the AACR meeting, Visvanathan said her team reviewed data on 10,062 ovarian cancer patients from the Finnish national cancer registry. 2,621 used statins, and 80% of those used lipophilic statins.

“Our results provide further evidence in support of the clinical evaluation of lipophilic statins as part of the treatment of ovarian cancer,” Visvanathan said.

Ovarian cancer is a rare cancer type, accounting for only about 1.2% of cancer cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Its five year survival rate is less than 50% because of the difficulty of diagnosing it until it has progressed to an advanced stage.

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Jun 6, 2023

Welcome to National Physical Therapy Month

Whoever first said the cure is worse than the illness must have been treated by a physical therapist.

The bending and stretching and twisting and turning and all the other manipulations and exercises they put you through might make you wonder if your physical therapist wasn’t a medieval torturer in a past life. But just when you’re thinking of giving up, you discover you can move your shoulder more naturally; the pain in your knee is almost gone; you can climb stairs and carry groceries and get back to doing what you used to be able to do.

For working those kinds of miracles every day, October is set aside as National Physical Therapy Month. It’s a way to recognize the nation’s physical therapists, but, as the American Physical Therapy Association says, it’s also an “annual opportunity to raise awareness about the benefits of physical therapy.”

While much of the work of a physical therapist is helping with recovery from an injury and surgery, you’ll find therapists helping improve mobility in seniors and those with debilitating conditions. Others work as trainers in gyms, colleges and with amateur and professional sports to improve fitness and help avoid injury. Prevention is always better than rehabilitation, which is why you’ll hear physical therapists urging us this month especially to get out and get active.

Becoming a licensed physical therapist is hard work and takes no less than three years. You first earn an undergraduate degree in a health-related field then earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy studying anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, pathology, orthotics and prosthetics, nutrition and other even more specialized courses. Hands-on clinical experience is always part of the curriculum.

To practice, they have to pass the National Physical Therapy Examination. Individual states have other requirements.

Many new graduates enter residency programs where they begin to specialize in particular areas like geriatrics and pediatrics and fitness.

Now that we’ve helped raise your awareness of the profession, be sure to thank your physical therapist and do your stretching and exercises.

Photo by Yulissa Tagle on Unsplash

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